Cyrus 7 BIGELOW



16225.22      Cyrus 7 BIGELOW, son of Jesse 6 ( Solomon 5 , Benjamin 4 , Jonathan 3 ,Joshua 2, John 1), and Thankful (FULFORD) BIGELOW, was born in Lyn township, Leeds, Ontario on 27 March 1797. He was married on 29 August 1826 at Brockville, to Rachel Cole. Rachel was born in Leeds co., Ontario on 30 October 1804 the daughter of John Cole and Catherine (_____) Cole. In 1848 Cyrus was a registered voter in Yonge township, Leeds county, but by 1851 was shown on census in Matilda township, Dundas county. He was a very successful farmer, judging from the agricultural returns on the 1861 census. He died on 04 April 1873 at Morrisburg, Ontario. His widow died on 10 March 1880. With the coming of the St. Lawrence Seaway, family graves were moved and it is believed they are now buried at Morrisburg.

Children of Cyrus and Rachel (Cole) Bigelow, all born at Lyn, Leeds, Ontano:

16225.221t    Jesse, b 02 May 1828; d 14 July 1872 Stormont co., Ont.; m ca 1862 Elizabeth Stethen; 5 children.

16225.222     Catherine, b ca 1830 (she never revealed her true age, except possibly on the 1851 census); d unknown date at Aultsville. Ont. Her headstone has no dates; buried at Morrisburg; unm.; she lived most of her life with brother George.

16225.223     Thankful, b ca 1833; d unknown date and bur. Morrisburg; like her sister. She never married and lived with her brother George.

16225.224t    John Nelson, b 03 March 1837; d 10 April 1921 Courtney, B.C.; m 06 May l863 Ellen Georgina Marcellus; 4 children

16225.225t    George, b 15 Nov 1839; d 28 Dec 1916 Aultsville; m 25 Dec 1876 Catherine B. Logan; 3 children.

Sources:
The Bigelow Family Genealogy, Volume II, page 202;
Howe,Bigelow Family of America;
Census, civil records, church and cemetery records;
family correspondence; family records.
Descendant note:
I was born in Smiths Falls, Ont.-now living in Port Coquitlam, BC., and it is such a gift to discover the Bigelow Society on the net. I have become interested in discovering more about my family's history. From information I discovered after my paternal grandmother died, I believe that I am descended from John Biglo in the following way. Brenda (12), James Alexander (11), Cyrus James (10), William Stern (9), Jesse 8, Cyrus 7, Jesse 6, Solomon 5, Benjamin 4 , Jonathan 3, Joshua 2, John 1. I am interested in making contact with anyone researching Ontario Bigelows.
 Brenda Ann (Bigelow) Allan    E-mail       malcolm@axion.net 

Note 11/24/06:
From: Gord Adams   gord@mediventures.ca

Rod,
This past week I uncovered some new information regarding the Bigelow’s of Ontario that would add to and correct information on your site.
I was trying to contact Brenda Ann (Bigelow) Allan to notify her of these findings as well.  I don’t know if you have a valid email address for her.
Here is some new info contained in an email to Brenda that bounced.
The JPG is a marriage record of William Stone Bigelow to Mary Miller
Note the Witnesses to the marriage were Augustus Blackburn and E. Blackburn.  There is strong evidence that shows this is a 2nd marriage for both Augustus and Elizabeth and that Augustus and Elizabeth are in fact William Stone Bigelow’s step father and mother respectively.
I have more detail if needed.

Gord Adams
Brenda,
I saw your name on the Bigelow Society web page.
This may not make sense to you for a second but a famous Canadian who lived in the SAME residence as your great grandfather William Stone Bigelow recently passed away.

Also, find attached a JPG of William Stone’s marriage to Mary Miller in 1886  (Ontario Marriage Registration 011674-86)

My GGGreat grandfather owned the land adjacent to the farm residence of Augustus Blackburn, William Stone Bigelow’s stepfather.  It took me a week, but I found out a lot about your ancestors since this obituary notice was posted, including the relationship of William Stone to this person, George Blackburn.  Much credit is due to Lynne Cook, of the Loyalist Resource Centre in Morrisburg, Ontario.

OBITUARY

George Blackburn
      BLACKBURN, George G. --- Peacefully, in his sleep, at 11:11 a.m.
November 15, 2006, in his 90th year at Ottawa's General Hospital where he'd
been diagnosed with cancer. Predeceased by his wife of 60 years Grace
Fortington, four years ago. Survived by three children, daughter Andrea of
Tallahassee, Florida, his sons Mark of Winnipeg and Ron of Ottawa. George G.
Blackburn is also survived by grandchildren Kim, David, Aaron, Ben, and
Maxine, and by great-grandchildren Victoria, Matthew, Thomas, Emily and
Lochlan. A man of many talents, including gifted pianist/composer, he
suddenly found himself, late in life, with hundreds of new friends from
around the world after authoring a WWII book trilogy, the first of which
"Guns of Normandy", was winner ten years ago of the Ottawa Citizen Book of
the Year Award (1996). The books provided a first hand account of Canadian
soldiers in action but didn't include details of how the author, as a young
artillery officer, was awarded the Military Cross in 1944 for helping save a
key bridgehead at the Twente Canal in Holland. Late-in-life awards included
the Order of Canada, the French Legion of Honour, the Edna Staebler Award
for Creative Non-Fiction. Earlier awards included honours for plays and
films of note. After a pre-war stint as reporter for the Ottawa Journal in
Pembroke, Captain George Blackburn returned from Europe to serve as Director
of Information, and Director of Fair Employment Practices, for the Federal
Department of Labour. Starting in the 1950's he became producer of the
longest-running radio show "Canada at Work", as well as an award-winning
documentary film script writer, which films included topics on the Older
Worker; Anti-Discrimination; a film starring Wayne & Schuster called "You
can Go a Long Way", encouraging teenagers to stay in high school rather than
drop out; and the country's most successful government campaign, "Why wait
for Spring? Do It Now!" Winter Works Campaign, which revolutionized winter
construction and employment during the winter months. Born in 1917 in a
farmhouse near Wales, Ontario, a village which disappeared beneath the
waters of the St. Lawrence Seaway, George Blackburn would later commemorate
the "saga of the Seaway", in his musical play "A Day to Remember" whose
songs were among hundreds for which he composed words and music. His musical
was professionally performed for two summers, at a theatre of his own
creation, near Upper Canada Village. His last expressed wish was that "young
people" be made aware of the sacrifice made by (generations of) soldiers on
behalf of Canadian freedom." Only weeks ago, he'd made his final, annual
visit to Manitoba's Camp Shilo - to address Canada's young artillery
officers. On a personal note, George Blackburn never "talked the talk" of
organized religion - though he believed in a creator God. But he "walked the
walk" never allowing anyone to "pick up the tab" at any event he attended,
and providing a life long banquet for widows and others who could never
replay him in kind. A great man, profoundly missed by those who survive him.
A celebration of George's life will be held on Saturday, November 18, at
Pinecrest Visitation Centre, 2500 Baseline Road, Ottawa, from 2:00 p.m.
until 4:00 p.m.                                       Published in the Ottawa
Citizen on 11/16/2006



Modified - 12/05/2006
(c) Copyright 2006 Bigelow Society, Inc. All rights reserved.
Rod  Bigelow - Director
rodbigelow@netzero.net


Rod Bigelow
Box 13  Chazy Lake
Dannemora, N.Y. 12929
  rodbigelow@netzero.net
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